Primary Source Paper: French Revolution

May 3, 2012 | Comments Off on Primary Source Paper: French Revolution

“Righting” the Wrong by Julia Peery Human rights during the French Revolution were largely biased against women, who had to fight for recognition from their own country within society and politics. Though the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen was seen as an accomplishment, it only affected French males. It […]

The French Revolution and Romanticism

May 1, 2012 | Comments Off on The French Revolution and Romanticism

There is little or no freedom of speech or expression in places that are ruled by oppressive tyrannical regimes. Such was the situation of France under the Monarchist dictatorship of the Catholic king called Louis XVI. The society was confined within the perimeters defined by the government with unfair laws and unequal distribution of resources. […]

Maximilien Robespierre

May 1, 2012 | Comments Off on Maximilien Robespierre

Violence, mass executions, mob rule, and injustice: the French Revolution was one of the most convulsive time periods in the history of the world. Radicals seized control of the government, and thousands of innocent people lost their lives, all in the name of democracy. The man at the head of the infamous “Reign of Terror” […]

The Enlightenment and the French Revolution

May 1, 2012 | Comments Off on The Enlightenment and the French Revolution

The Intellectual movement known as the Enlightenment occupies an important position in the growth of Western civilization. How it totally affected society, especially French society is a subject of debate, from the beginning of the Revolution to today. In fact, two schools of interpretation are involved. The first school is the conservative school, Edmund Burke […]

Declaration of the Rights of Women and Citizen

April 30, 2012 | Comments Off on Declaration of the Rights of Women and Citizen

Here is a primary source document, Olympe de Gouges’ “Declaration of the Rights of Women and Citizen.” It is a response to the “Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen.” “Woman, wake up!” Thus did Olympe de Gouges (d. 1793), a self-educated playwright, address French women in 1791. Aware that women were being denied […]

Feminism in the French Revolution

April 30, 2012 | Comments Off on Feminism in the French Revolution

The Women’s March to Versailles is one example of protofeminist militant activism during the French Revolution. Though the march was overwhelmingly made up women by all accounts, they did not make explicitly feminist demands. While largely left out of the thrust for increasing rights of citizens, as the question was left indeterminate in the Declaration […]

In 18th-century France, ninety-five percent of the population were adherents of the Catholic Church; most of the rest were Protestant Huguenots, who, although greatly outnumbered by the Catholics, nonetheless retained powerful positions in French local governments. (A small population of Jews, amounting to around 40,000, also existed, and very small numbers of Muslims may also […]

Louis Charles

April 26, 2012 | Comments Off on Louis Charles

Louis XVII, or Louis Charles,  son of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette, was orphaned during the French Revolution when his parents were executed. At eight years old, he was imprisoned and tortured. He died at age ten. There are many questions surround his death: The fate of the “lost dauphin,” Louis XVII, has been a subject of […]

British Reaction to the Execution of Louis Capet

April 26, 2012 | Comments Off on British Reaction to the Execution of Louis Capet

In Britain, initial reports of the beginning of the French Revolution were greeted with excitement by many observers, who saw a nation abandoning absolutism for a liberal constitution similar to the British model. Parliamentary Whigs, who’s attempts at gaining political power were being stifled by William Penn, were especially sympathetic. In 1789, a sermon delivered […]

Execution of Louis XVI

April 26, 2012 | Comments Off on Execution of Louis XVI

Louis XVI, king of France, arrived in the wrong historical place at the wrong time and soon found himself overwhelmed by events beyond his control. Ascending the throne in 1774, Louis inherited a realm driven nearly bankrupt through the opulence of his predecessors Louis XIV and XV. After donning the crown, things only got worse. […]