With the fall of Napoleon’s conquest and the rise of industrialization, Europe in the 1800s underwent a massive change that challenged the norms and traditions that had persisted for generations.  Europe’s rapid modernization brought along revolutionary thoughts and actions that shaped the world as it is today.  Oscar Wilde’s comedy The Importance of Being Earnest […]

In October of 1844 in the German town of Röken bei Lützen, Friedrich Nietzsche was born to Karl and Franziska Nietzsche.  After his father’s death in 1849, Nietzsche’s family moved to Naumburg an der Saale, where he later attended his first-rate boarding school, Schulpforta.  Nietzsche later attended the University of Bonn with a focus in philology, and […]

Kaitryn Evans Primary Source Paper: The 19th century marked a turning point in European history. The industrial revolution was in full swing and was quickly transforming all aspects of society. Skilled workers saw their individual crafts reduced to anonymous assembly line manufacturing. These workers were forced to adjust to a new working class standard with […]

Why Britian Avoided Revolution from 1815-1848 April 27, 2012 | | Comments Off Original Work by Jeffrey Hoehn While the rest of Europe was engaging in revolutions for nationalism and independence, Britain was busy industrializing even further and solving governmental problems through words not war.  Some of the reasons why Britain was able to avoid substantial […]

By: Avneet Kang, Stratton Gilmore and Jennifer Camarena Edited By: Susie Townsend After the Congress of Vienna, Italy was split into several different independent governments. In 1815, Austria was received most of the country, while the rest of the country was turned into three separate nations. Italy consisted of, but was not limited to: The Papal States, […]

Italian Unification

November 11, 2013 | Comments Off on Italian Unification

By: Avneet Kang, Stratton Gilmore and Jennifer Camarena After the Congress of Vienna, the Italian country we know today was split into several different independent governments. In 1815, the Congress of Vienna gave Austria control over most of the Italian peninsula while other areas of Italy were divided up into three separate nations. Italy consisted […]

Why Britian Avoided Revolution from 1815-1848

April 27, 2012 | Comments Off on Why Britian Avoided Revolution from 1815-1848

Original Work by Jeffrey Hoehn While the rest of Europe was engaging in revolutions for nationalism and independence, Britain was busy industrializing even further and solving governmental problems through words not war.  Some of the reasons why Britain was able to avoid substantial violence was its characteristic of enjoying the broadest political and religious freedom.  […]

The phenomenon of serfdom and the manner in which it changed between 1772 and 1848 are analyzed by Ludwig von Mises and Ivan Franko. Soviet historians are particularly concerned with the reactions of the peasants to their plight: Fedit Steblii has traced peasant “rebellions” and the brigand movement in eastern Galicia during the first half […]

Original Work by Jeffrey Hoehn Born in Genoa in 1805, Mazzini would be known as one of the most influential Italian leaders in nationalism leading to the unification of Italy.  Mazzini began his studies of law in Genoa, and earned his degree in law at the university there and began his life as a revolutionary.  […]

Leading up to the Hungarian Revolution of 1848

April 16, 2012 | Comments Off on Leading up to the Hungarian Revolution of 1848

Original Work by Jeffrey Hoehn The Hungarian Revolution of 1848 was much like other revolutions in the fact that it was a reaction against conservative, monarchical rule.  The origins of the revolution can be traced back to the reconvening of parliament in Hungary after more than a decade.  Reforms were to be made in Hungary […]